Great Courses to Consider

By now, you’re probably finalizing your course registration. But if you’re stuck on a waitlist or still looking for a great course with an open seat, try one of these:

CLASS-UA 291: Special Topics in Classics: Science Fiction Before Science 

How would you define science fiction? Are futuristic settings, advanced technologies, and alien worlds fundamental aspects of the genre? If so, what roles can subsequent exploration, discovery, and innovation play in changing our reception of a work as science fiction? In this class, we will read excerpts from a variety of ancient texts, including Homer’s Odyssey, Herodotus’ Histories, and Lucian’s True History alongside modern works by Doris Lessing, Richard Adams, and Ursula K. Le Guin (among others) in order to assess what parallels can be drawn between their respective treatments of technology, history, religion, and culture. Our goal is to work toward a definition of science fiction critically, while paying special attention to the techniques that each author employs in describing and analyzing a world that is not their own.”

lit wars

BIOL-UA 8: Living Environment

An issues-oriented course in biology emphasizing the current understanding of fundamental contemporary matters in life and environmental sciences. Covers topics such as evolution, biodiversity, genetic engineering, the human genome, bioterrorism, climate, pollution, and diseases. Examines the interrelationship within living systems and their environments.

environ cat

COLIT-UA 132: Delirious Knowledge and Desire in Literature, Film, and Music

At its limit, ecstatic experience threatens to pull you dangerously into the unknown, to destroy your sense of self, to change you in such a way that you can no longer return to what you used to be.

COLIT-UA 132

SOC-UA 111: Sociological Theory

Is a society more than the sum of the individuals in it? Does it have its own history of growth and change? Can people work together to change it for the better? Social theory illuminates the ways that individuals are shaped and constrained by the social relations into which they are born, yet social theorists have often argued that existing social relations are unnecessarily harmful, holding out hope for their reform or revolutionary transformation. Sometimes, problems that seem to each individual to be their own personal troubles can only be confronted together, as issues for public debate and action. It is the job of social theory to make the connection from personal trouble to public issue. Above all, social theory shows that inequalities—in workplaces, families, the public sphere, and elsewhere—are not immobile facts of nature but instead can be challenged. In this course, we will delve into some of the foundational (but conflicting!) contributions of social theorists who have sought to understand, first, why society is the way it is and, second, whether and how its harms can be fixed.

Soci-111

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